Easter Bunnies and Other Critters

It’s impossible to avoid bunnies around the Easter weekend. No matter where you shop, chocolate bunnies stare you in the face. When my kids were young, we would organize a hunt for Easter Sunday morning, which would be followed by an Easter brunch. We planted clues around the house, and my daughters would have to follow the clues to find their Easter baskets. I put in a lot of work creating those Easter puzzles, but my kids always managed to find their baskets in short order. They were just too smart for me.
And the rabbits aren’t just inside the house this time of year. The live bunnies—properly hares—hop brazenly around my neighbourhood. Last year, I had a big buck hare that created a nest for himself in my front flower-bed. If I came down the sidewalk, he would grudgingly move, then wait for me to get lost before going back to his hollow. It’s around Easter that these hares begin to change colour, going from white to brown in the anticipation of spring. These critters really are fearless, which isn’t so good for them when the occasional coyote finds its way into the neighbourhood.
If you’ve had your fill of Easter bunnies, and you are looking for something new to read to kids or grandkids, I would recommend Burra Nimu, the Easter Bilby from Australia. What is a bilby? You’ll just have to check it out for yourself. My daughter put me onto this story last year, and it’s one worth adding to your Easter traditions. However you celebrate Easter, enjoy, and spread the love of story.

A conversation with Australia

This week, I had the good fortune to talk to a group of grade six students from Melbourne, Australia. We used FaceTime to talk, and they had lots of questions.
They learned a little about me beforehand. They knew I’m totally blind, and that I lost my sight in a car accident as a kid. They knew I teach at a university, and they knew I spend much of my time reading kid’s books.
This is a perceptive group of kids. Some of their questions surprised me.
Here are some of the questions, and my best approximation of the answers.
Q. How long did it take you to learn braille?
A. It took about three months. I was in the hospital for several months after my accident, and someone came in a couple of times a week to teach me.
Q. Do you use braille to read your books?
A. No. I always found braille hard to use. I read audio books, and I have a voice program on my computer called JAWS that I use to read anything electronic, such as student essays. I also read books on my IPhone and my IPad.
Q. What was it like in the hospital? Were people nice to you?
A. Yes, people were nice and generally helpful. It only got hard once I was out of the hospital and back at my old school. I went to a special class with other visually impaired kids after Christmas, but then I was back in my old school for grade seven the next fall. It was hard then because many of the other kids didn’t know how to treat me anymore. Kids can sometimes be mean to one another, so there was lots of teasing.
Q. What do you see, or do you see anything at all?
A. that’s a good question. Close your eyes, and tell me what you see.
— I see darkness but bits of colour and dots and things.
— That’s what I see, if I choose to pay attention.
Q. How do you understand beauty?
A. that’s another good question. I think of lots of things as beautiful. It’s fall here right now, and often at this time of the year we can have snow. But we’re having a warm October. I walk a lot, so when I’m out enjoying a walk, I think of the fall as beautiful.
Q. Do you have any hobbies?
A. Yes, I do pottery. I’ve been doing that for a couple of years. I make bowls and cups and other things. I also carve in soapstone. Carving soapstone takes longer, and I can only carve outside because it’s so messy, but I like to make birds and whales and other animals.
Q. what kind of music do you like?
A. Well, lots, I suppose. I listen to lots of folk music. Do you guys like U2? (a chorus of agreement). I like U2 as well.
Q. Do you have a favourite movie?
A. Not really. I like to watch movies. I like watching films that are adapted from books, like the Lord of the Rings movies or the Narnia films.
Q. What is your favourite book?
A. That’s a hard question. I don’t know if I can say that I have a favourite book. I have lots of favourite authors, like Tolkien and Lewis. I like reading series as well. One of my favourites in the last couple of years has been the Bartimaeus series by Jonathan Stroud. I just finished a series by Brandon Mull called Fablehaven, and I’m reading another series by an Australian author called Trudi Canavan—The Black Magician Trilogy.
We talked like that for almost an hour, and they had many more questions. I was gratified to spend time with such an interested and perceptive bunch of kids from another part of the world. No doubt we could have found many other things that we shared if we’d had more time.  Unfortunately, their schedule wouldn’t allow for it. Perhaps one day we can talk again.